The Pride https://wwsthepride.org The Student News Site of Wheaton Warrenville South High School Tue, 12 Nov 2019 01:10:34 -0600 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 Quote of the Week: Nov 17th – 23rd https://wwsthepride.org/1249/quote-of-the-week/quote-of-the-week-nov-17th-23rd/ Sun, 17 Nov 2019 13:00:11 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1249

“Now that I know that I am no wiser than anyone else, does this wisdom make me wiser?“

-Hugh Prather

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Benefits of Busy https://wwsthepride.org/1166/opinion/benefits-of-busy/ Tue, 12 Nov 2019 01:10:34 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1166 Most high school students willingly admit that they are too busy, but yet they wouldn’t change a thing. Today, teenagers are involved in many activities and extracurriculars, which often create hectic lifestyles but are necessary for growth. Despite arguments emphasizing its weaknesses, being busy teaches students good time management, better prepares them for college, and also provides them with friends and communities.

Many argue that students are too busy because they are not getting at least 8 hours of sleep each night. With school, sports, practices, and homework, students have a lot to juggle. This is where time management comes in. Such time-demanding daily routines require key time management skills, such as the ability to prioritize. Instead of seeing busy lifestyles as negative, teenagers should view their schedules as preparation for their futures.

According to Mountain Heights Academy, students who add activities into their busy schedules end up improving their time management: “The student who is busy with coursework but also needs to balance two other extracurricular activities is more likely to plan out time dedicated to each activity and less likely to procrastinate during downtime.” Time management is an important life skill that should be developed early on. For the rest of their lives, kids will have multiple things to complete each day, whether in college or when they are married with a family. It is a necessity to be able to prioritize responsibilities and be aware of scheduling in order to complete necessary tasks. High school students are able to learn time management at an early stage through their packed schedules. 

In high school, many are also preparing for their lives in college, which means keeping up GPAs and staying involved in activities. Today more than ever, colleges are looking for students with multiple interests and who are thoroughly involved at their high schools. Jeff Ludovici, an education consultant, says that students should be striving to stand out among the thousands applying to colleges each year. Ludovici says, “Students who attend classes and do limited things, like just sports, make themselves unidimensional and will not stand out in comparison to students who have diverse interests in the arts, technology, humanistic efforts, or otherwise show their creativity and innovation.” 

While this expectation definitely adds more pressure for students to pack their schedules, it proves how being involved with many different activities may pay off in the future. Extracurriculars are a huge factor for colleges throughout the application process; therefore, so are busy schedules. 

Finally, the things that make teenagers busy are the exact same things that make high school such a fun experience. Many students form communities and close friendships through their extracurriculars. Jill King, a senior at Wheaton Warrenville South High School, is involved with the school’s tennis and lacrosse teams. “My extracurriculars have allowed me to make many more friends and open myself up to new experiences and sports that I would have never pictured myself doing but have become a big part of my life,” says King, “My activities have taught me leadership, working with others, trying new things, and provided a community outside of academics.”

Another senior at WWS, Ashley Zima, admits that she is very busy, but says she wouldn’t take anything out of her high school experience. Zima states that her extracurriculars are “something I look forward to doing and something fun in the midst of the stress of high school.” 

For many, the pros of a busy schedule and being involved far outweigh the cons. Without busy schedules, many students would not be provided with the opportunity to learn skills that cannot be taught in a classroom. Being involved and constantly on the go is something that teenagers should get used to at a young age in order to prepare for life as an adult. 

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Is it Worth Giving Money to Homeless People? https://wwsthepride.org/1165/opinion/is-it-worth-giving-money-to-homeless-people/ Tue, 12 Nov 2019 00:53:22 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1165 Imagine getting of the Metra, heading out of Ogilvie Station, and then seeing a homeless person. Nearby pedestrians are minding their own business and carrying on with their lives while this person is sitting on the curb, holding up a sign about how their life led up to this current moment. They are famished, appear to be rugged and made eye contact with you to see whether or not you would be generous enough to donate even a penny. Many people choose to ignore the homeless, usually because they don’t know what their donation will be going towards or if the homeless person is lying about their socioeconomic status. However, as the rate of homelessness rises, the best solution would be for people to donate nonperishable items or services to the needy instead of their cash or spare change.

While homeless people are indeed homeless due to unemployment, eviction, etc. it is not the case for all bankrupt people. According to the Atlantic, the Department of Housing and Urban Development found that “six out of ten homeless respondents admitted problems with alcohol and drugs. Given the likelihood of self-reported bias, the actual number could be higher”. Given the various struggles of addiction, it can be difficult to determine whether or not a beggar will invest his newly funds on viable resources or enabling their addiction, thereby slandering donors’ good intentions.

Sophomore student Katie Price says, “…we don’t know what this person will use the money for. Instead, giving actual items or actual food to the homeless could help them because then you’ll know what they’ll do with it”. 

While some may believe that it is better to donate resources than dollars, others believe that giving beggars money will help them seek better opportunities, and because it is, perhaps, morally correct. According to BBC News, the Advertising Standards Authority claims that those who produce ads about keeping wallets concealed due to suspected drug use in homeless populations are stimulating negative stereotypes.

One charity spokesman argues that “Not everyone who begs is homeless and not all homeless people will beg. Nevertheless, people who do beg are often some of the most vulnerable in our society, and many will be struggling with extreme poverty.”

Although destitutes struggle with compiling funds for supplies needed to survive on the streets, “Not everyone who begs is homeless”. According to Homeless Hub, the Canadian Medical Association Journal interviewed 54 panhandlers and discovered that “while all had been homeless at some point in their life, only 65% were currently homeless. 24% had their own room or apartment but needed to panhandle to gain additional income.” People who were once homeless are still panhandling in order to keep up with their rent. By understanding that most people would dismiss panhandlers who aren’t homeless, non-homeless people tend to lie in order to have continuous income. If most panhandlers were upfront about their struggle with addiction or about their economic status, they would be ignored in the streets with empty pockets.

Regardless, it is devastating to see the needy on the street. But according to WWS student Jessica Benjamin, “money doesn’t necessarily improve the situation.” Instead of giving away hard cash, people can give away gift cards to restaurants or clothing store that the homeless or other panhandlers can utilize at a later time. Passing pedestrians can also volunteer their time at shelters or donate more personal care items, like sanitary pads for homeless women. But if someone on the street is going to spend money by giving it to a panhandler, as WWS student Ben Howell would argue, they should “spend money on fixing the broken system that continues to put more and more families on the street.”

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Quote of the Week: Nov 10th – 16th https://wwsthepride.org/1232/quote-of-the-week/quote-of-the-week-nov-10th-16th/ Sun, 10 Nov 2019 11:00:02 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1232

“If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.”

-Milton Berle

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Access for Seniors https://wwsthepride.org/1167/opinion/access-for-seniors/ Sun, 10 Nov 2019 01:16:01 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1167 Wheaton Warrenville South student Zoe, already suffering greatly from the chronic illness senioritis, talks with her friends during her lunch periods. Little does she know she will fail her AP Environmental Science class due to her lack of motivation. Many seniors are reluctant to admit that having access is beneficial for them. 

The removal of access for Wheaton Warrenville South seniors is not beneficial because of the lack of motivation to keep grades up and the safety issues that come with more student freedom. 

Not having access can prevent seniors from receiving important information that other grades have access to. A large portion of WWS seniors also have late arrival, meaning they start their day with second period, missing morning announcements. “I know lots of people, including myself, who have accidentally skipped an important assembly because I didn’t know about it,” says senior Natalie Harding. It can be hard for staff to hold assemblies during lunch hours and get information out effectively when students don’t have a place to report back to. 

Access was put into place to help teach students how to productively complete their schoolwork in a given school day. Without scheduled time to complete homework, the motivation to do so decreases, not to mention the already low drive first semester seniors already have. Senior, Molly Jamen says, “I think it’s really hard when I’m not required to go to access and try to make myself go to get help. It would motivate me more to go to resource if I had to sit in an access class.” Access can be an important tool to help students practice time management and improve their grades. 

According to Vijay Sharma in the article Importance of Time Management for Students, Time management is important for students to get high marks. Student’s success in studies depends much on managing time efficiently. The habits and morals they acquire during school time and home will stick with them throughout the future.” Mastering the skill of time management will carry over into every student’s lives. 

Students say discontinuing access this year was the best decision because it gives seniors more freedom to socialize with their friends before graduation. Although it is nice to spend time with friends, it is also a potential safety issue. 

Being bored at lunch is inevitable when the lunch periods are 48 minutes long and students end up wandering the school to avoid the cafeteria. “I normally eat lunch outside of the cafeteria, so I can see how people not knowing where I am can be a potential safety issue,” Jamen says. It is important that staff knows where students are in case of an emergency and it will be hard to find a specific person in this situation when they are not accounted for.

On top of that, the school can be liable if a student were to harm other student’s safety. With more freedom comes more danger in our learning communities.  According to Findlaw’s Team of legal writers and editors, “Under the theory of “premises liability“, occupiers and owners of land (including schools) are legally required to keep premises safe for those who are legally allowed to be there. The law generally requires owners and occupiers of land to exercise a “reasonable amount of care” in providing a safe environment on their premises.” Who’s to say someone won’t have the intention of using their extended lunch period to attack the school? Without accountability comes the danger of possibility and by giving students more unsupervised freedom, schools are allowing it to happen. 

Perhaps, instead of instituting access again, the school can find an alternative where students are allowed to socialize, study, and be supervised.

Now, with the new and improved access system, Zoe is able to collaborate with her friends and teachers to pull up her grades and now expects to graduate on time. No super senior swag!

 

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Should Stay at Home Parents Be Paid? https://wwsthepride.org/1168/opinion/should-stay-at-home-parents-be-paid/ Sun, 10 Nov 2019 01:07:52 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1168 One in five US parents are stay-at-home parents. That means that at least 20% of the parents in America are at home during the day, doing miscellaneous tasks to take care of children and the home, and in return are not paid. Being a stay at home parent is very common in the United States and some think that those parents should be rewarded for their hard work, but in reality, stay at home parents should not be paid. 

The primary reason that stay at home parents should not be paid is that there is nobody to pay them for the work that is being done. In an article titled Should Stay-at-Home Parents Get Wages for Housework? by Samantha Eyler, she states “Who pays you to do it? For most families, whatever a parent’s preferences, whatever the benefits, staying at home is only an option where there are (at least) two partners and one can support the other — or effectively pay their partner a wage for their domestic work.” The government and spouses are the only two ways that stay-at-home parents could possibly be paid, and neither option is helping the economy, or the amount of money that families are bringing home each week.

Those who believe that stay at home parents should be paid tend to base their arguments off their own personal lives. In an article titled Stay-at-Home Parents Work Hard. Should They be Paid?, Claire Cain Miller shares 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang’s side of the argument. “‘I know my wife is working harder than I am, and I’m running for president. And right now, the market values her work at zero. So we have to think bigger about what we mean by work and value,’” said Yang. According to Yang, stay at home parents are not valued as much as they should be and paying them would make up for the hard work they put into keeping things running at home. 

Although stay at home parents make lots of sacrifices to make sure that things are in order at the house, and to nurture children, there is no proper way to measure their work. There is not a clear way to determine how much each stay at home parent should get paid, and in this case we would surely want fair pay for something such as being a stay at home parent. Jill King, daughter of a stay-at-home Mom also questions how each parent’s work would be measured. “It is easy for one parent to say they are a stay-at-home parent who gets a lot of work done throughout the day but who is to say that they actually stay true to their word instead of sitting around doing nothing the whole day,” said King. 

Meg Jamen, a mom to 3 kids who was a stay-at-home and work from home mom for 11 years, thinks that stay-at-home parents should not be paid for many reasons. “The whole point of having a family is so that you have people that you love and want to spend time with after a hard day at work. Staying at home to take care of family shouldn’t have to be a job,” said Jamen. The responsibility of caring for your children is one that comes with becoming a parent and it shouldn’t be a paid job. 

While most parents would love the opportunity to stay home and take care of their kids all day, if all parents stayed home to get paid, there would be unemployment in other areas of work due to the lack of parents leaving home in order to make money. There are many different things that stay-at-home parents can do to make money while staying home. Some possibilities are blogging, selling baked goods or even offering to watch other families’ kids at your own home while the parents are at work. Obviously there are other options and ways to get paid while staying at home with the kids, but the work that parents do to maintain the house and lives of their children should not be rewarded with money. 

 

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Mental Health Days https://wwsthepride.org/1184/opinion/mental-health-days/ Tue, 05 Nov 2019 23:41:58 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1184 According to Psychology Today, “The average high school kid today has the same level of anxiety as the average psychiatric patient in the early 1950’s”. With the amount of tasks and activities students have to handle every day it’s easy see the origination of this high level of anxiety. 

Students at Wheaton Warrenville South High School are desperate for a solution to help  control their stress and anxiety. A senior at South, Zoe Jethani, has found a solution of her own. She calls them mental health days and she takes about 4 or 5 of them every school year. On her mental health days she, “sleeps in and catches up on work”. Jethani usually takes these days off during her most stressful parts of the year, such as finals week or even a week that is so busy she doesn’t have much time to do work. “I feel less stressed and more prepared for the rest of the school week”. She has felt results from these days off once she could finally focus on catching up on work, reducing her feeling of being overwhelmed.

Mental health days seem to be the only solution to help students control the amount of work and activities they have to handle outside of school. However there are other options in school for students needing more advice and support–high school counselors. However, the National Association of Secondary School Principals reports that “By the 2014–15 school year, there was one school counselor for every 482 students. The recommended ratio from the American School Counseling Association is one school counselor for every 250 students”. Counselors are supposed to care for each student individually and meet each one’s needs, but it’s hard to keep track of more than 482 students and the unique life of each one. 

However a good support system at school is important for students to get the attention they deserve and keep in check with them if their families can’t. The National School of Psychologists states that “Schools offer an ideal context for prevention, intervention, positive development, and regular communication between school and families”. Even though counselors can’t give their all to each student, those in need of immediate help can have a strong support system. On the other hand, the school environment could be the whole reason for stress and anxiety in students.

The Washington Post reports that “83 percent of teens said that school was “a somewhat or significant source of stress”. Taking this in account, it’s clear that something needs to be done to help students cope with the stress of today’s life. “I think that mental health is an issue and needs to be addressed on a more day-to-day basis with students and teachers” says Jethani. Students can get so caught up in the idea of perfection that they forget their own health should be first priority. Yet she isn’t the only one who thinks this mental health days are beneficial. Fiona Deguzman, a senior at South, takes those days to “recharge when the pressures of school and outside activities are too overwhelming”. 

High school students are calling out for help and are looking for the school district to pay attention to the needs of stressed students. If the school was to give a student one mental health day each semester, students could finally use a day to improve their productivity and lifestyle, leading to better habits for the future.

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My Two Cents https://wwsthepride.org/1240/opinion/my-two-cents/ Tue, 05 Nov 2019 17:18:15 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1240 Walking down Michigan Avenue, the tall buildings glistening overhead, a man with a small dog and a wheelchair sits at the street corner with a sign that reads, “Money 4 food.” Feeling unsure of what to do, you give him a wide breadth and guiltily hurry away, not knowing whether to look or to avoid eye contact. You have heard the rumors, “All they will ever spend it on is drugs and alcohol,” but your heart hurts as you pass by. The struggle of whether to give or not to give money to homeless individuals on the street is one that people of all ages are faced with, especially those who live in more densely populated areas. Although giving money directly to homeless people has the potential to alleviate their immediate needs, the best way to benefit the homeless population is through hands on volunteering and providing a way out of poverty. 

Homelessness is a widespread issue that affects multiple sectors of the population and is prevalent in the Chicagoland area. According to the Chicago Tribune, “With more than 80,000 people who are homeless or lacking adequate shelter in Chicago, according to a May 2018 Chicago Coalition for the Homeless analysis of 2016 census data, this may be a problem you run into almost every day as you make your way through the city.” 

As a result of the ubiquity of homeless people and the severity of their situation, some are inclined to donate money directly to the individual in need. According to Diane O’Connell, a community lawyer for the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, “If you believe in the dignity and autonomy of other human beings, then you believe and understand that money is what they need to meet their basic needs.” Regarding the fears that the homeless will simply turn around and spend the money on alcohol and drugs, O’Connell states, “Whether or not a person has an addiction they also have personal needs.” 

Mrs. Williams, a teacher at Wheaton-Warrenville South High School, expressed a similar sentiment when she shared her philosophy from when she used to live in the city. “I don’t feel like it’s my right to impose on someone else what they can and cannot [spend the money on]. They can spend it on whatever because that’s part of human dignity […] You’re not going to save someone from destruction whether you give or don’t give, it’s a systemic problem that stems beyond an individual donation,” Williams stated. 

Some South Students expressed similar viewpoints. Nicolas Kozee reflected, “I’ve always been told that if I give money to homeless people, they’ll just use it for drugs. I don’t think this is always true and frankly, what happens with the money after I give it to someone is none of my business. The changes of the money I give being used to help someone outweighs any possible negative outcomes.” 

While it is true that donating money directly to those in need has the potential to be very effective in eliminating their short term hardships, this method is not without repercussions. According to The Atlantic, “We choose to donate money based on the level of perceived need. Beggars known this, so there is an incentive on their part to exaggerate their need, by either lying about their circumstances or letting their appearance visibly deteriorate rather than seek help.” In a sense, donating enables the beggar to remain a beggar. 

Although donating money has certain drawbacks, these drawbacks can be eliminated when the donation is accompanied by support. The old proverb comes to mind, “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” The homeless do not just need money, they need a way off the streets and a way to get started–they need a guiding hand. Instead of donating to the individual, effectively giving a fish to feed them for the day, people should donate to charitable organizations that have the necessary tools to provide services such as addiction recovery, medical care, job placement, shelter, food, sanitation, and other necessities that plague the homeless population and make getting off the streets so difficult. 

To this end, according to The Atlantic, “If we drop change in a beggar’s hand without donating to a charity, we’re acting to relieve our guilt rather than [the] underlying crisis of poverty.” Therefore, although the decision is entirely up to the individual and varies based on the situation, it is more beneficial in the long run to donate funds and volunteer at nonprofits that benefit the homeless. In this way, we are donating more than just the loose change from our pockets, we are showing that we care.

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Quote of the Week: Nov. 3rd – 9th https://wwsthepride.org/1217/quote-of-the-week/quote-of-the-week-nov-3rd-9th/ Sun, 03 Nov 2019 12:00:10 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1217

“I have always believed, and I still believe, that whatever good or bad fortune may come our way can always give meaning and transform it into something of value.”

-Herman Hesse

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4 Easy DIY Halloween Costumes https://wwsthepride.org/1207/features/4-easy-diy-halloween-costumes/ Wed, 30 Oct 2019 02:32:18 +0000 https://wwsthepride.org/?p=1207 Dressing up for Halloween is so much fun, but sometimes it’s hard to decide what you’re going to be. No one wants to be stuck buying the first thing they see at Target, but they also don’t have time to create an elaborate costume by themselves. Fear no more! This collection of 4 DIY costumes will help people scrambling for ideas at the last minute.

Skittles or M&Ms

  1. Get a red or brown shirt.
  2. Cut out different-colored circles of construction paper.
  3. Write “s” or “m” on each circle in white crayon, colored pencil, or pen. You could also paint the letters with white paint for a bolder effect.
  4. Use a glue gun to adhere the Skittles or M&Ms to the shirt.

Pro Tip: Give the glue gun time to heat up so that the glue is nice and liquidy. Also, be extra careful to avoid burning yourself.

Jellyfish

  1. Use an umbrella that’s clear or is a bright solid color.
  2. Get feather boas and tulle that go with your color scheme.
  3. Using a glue gun or clear packaging tape, adhere the feather boas and tulle to the edge of the umbrella like tentacles.
  4. Add eyes to the umbrella using either felt or drawing with a marker.
  5. Dress up in colors that go with the jellyfish.

Pro Tip: Add LED lights to the umbrella to make the jellyfish glow.

Stuffed Animal

  1. Grab your favorite animal onesie.
  2. Make a tag of a popular stuffed animal brand such as ty, Douglas, or Build-a-Bear.
  3. Punch a hole in the tag and use a ribbon to create a bracelet or lanyard for the stuffed animal.

Candy Corn

Warning: This one requires more time!

  1. Get a plain white shirt.
  2. Using tie dye, make the bottom third of the shirt yellow and the middle third orange, leaving the top white.
  3. Put the shirt in a plastic bag and let it sit for about a day.
  4. Then take the shirt out of the bag to squeeze out excess dye and wash it for the first time in the washing machine.
  5. Pair with black pants for extra warmth!

Pro Tip: You can also make the iconic white candy corn tip by taking a plastic headband and taping a white paper cone on top.

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